NVIDIA 30 Series Gaming Laptops used for cryptocurrency mining in China

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NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 30 Series products are in high demand. Over the past five months the company has released new graphics cards that have, without fail, sold out almost instantly when pre-orders go live.

While many want to use the latest GPUs to play games at the highest possible settings, the 30 Series has also been used by cryptocurrency miners looking to jump on Bitcoin or Ethereum's surge in price.

Here's a look at one GeForce RTX 3060 laptop farm in action...

Cryptomining farm in China

As first spotted by Wffctech, one Twitter user has shared a video of a cryptocurrency mining farm allegedly set up in China. Based on these images, the farm appears to have tens of laptops working simultaneously to mine cryptocurrency.

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These laptops bear the manufacturing logo of Hasse, which uses NVIDIA's RTX 3060 GPU. These laptops can cost upwards of $1000, but as TechArpstates, mining Ethereum via twenty of these laptops could net you almost $80,000 in Ethereum per year, for $20,000 worth of laptops.

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Still, the images shared of such cryptomining farms is likely to anger or frustrate many gamers who have struggled to find NVIDIA's latest 30 Series products online, amid unprecedent demand from gamers, scalpers and cryptominers alike. It is worth noting, however, that NVIDIA's 3060 laptops are still in stock.

READ MORE: NVIDIA rumoured to be producing 1050 Ti to ease stock issues

How does cryptomining work?

You might be wondering what the NVIDIA GPUs have to do with cryptocurrency mining. It essentially boils down to the fact that cryptomining requires a lot of processing power.

Miners receive cryptocurrency for verifying Bitcoin transactions - acting as a sort of auditor. Once they have mined 1MB of data (known as a block), then they will be paid. However, to verify such transactions requires miners to be the first to solve the numeric problem and arrive at the solution - known as the hash (a sixty-four-digit hexadecimal code).

The issue here is that there are trillions of potential solutions, meaning that miners use devices with high processing power to essentially guess the hash first. You can check out your rigs 'hash rate' here.

READ MORE: Looks like NVIDIA has lowered the RAM for the upcoming RTX 3080Ti, but why?