What’s new about the PS5? The PlayStation 5 has some HUGE upgrades on the PS4

Find out about the new features the PS5 has. It’s got a lot of upgrades compared to the PS4.

by Jason Coles
PS5 Standard Edition console price release date

The PS5 is stuffed full of exciting new bits of tech, comes with some new fancy peripherals, and promises to change the way we game forever.

That’s all good and well of course, but without comparisons it’s hard to know how much of all of this is actually new, and how much is just an upgrade.

The bigger numbers are lovely, but how will they affect things, and what, if anything, is actually brand-new in the PS5?

Well, here’s what you need to know about what’s new with the PS5.

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What’s new with hardware in PS5?

The main new additions, and this is by far and away the one that should be getting the most attention, is the custom made SSD.

This is basically a super-charged version of storage that should completely change how games can be designed and even eliminate load times, or at least nearly eliminate them.

There’s also 3D Audio, which should completely change how sound design can work in games, with sounds being bounced around like magic to make you believe you’re in a rainstorm because there is one on-screen.

Finally, you’ve got the DualSense controller. This features both haptic feedback and adaptive triggers. These should combine to make games that literally feel completely different.

READ MORE: Trade-in price for PS4 will make PS5 cheaper!

How will this all affect PS5 games?

Well, from the top to the bottom, the SSD should completely change how games can be designed. The ability to load more in faster should mean the end of pesky slow elevators, squeezing through gaps, and awkward loading screens.

The 3D Audio could change how sound design is created, and how it’s delivered. If you can literally hear the rain falling around you then imagine how much better battle royale games will be.

The DualSense is perhaps the strangest of the bunch. Adaptive triggers could potentially allow for more resistance when trying to fire a jammed gun, or trying to walk through mud.

The haptic feedback allows for more feedback the closer you are to something, which could help a lot if you can’t see the screen for some reason. Imagine having your controller humming lightly when you’re far away from something then vibrating through your hands when you’re closer.

READ MORE: Should you stick with PS4 or get a PS5?

Jason Coles