Researchers create a solution to VR motion sickness

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One of the largest barriers to VR gaming's growth is motion sickness. When playing games in a virtual environment, your characters move around, while you stay still. This can create a pretty disorientating and nauseating experience.

While this problem can be mitigated by limiting your playtime, taking tablets, or gradually easing your way into more VR gaming over time, it's obvious that a solution is needed.

That's where Kagenova comes in. As reported by Digital Trends, Kagenova was founded by Jason McEwen of University College London. This startup has made a new algorithm that may help mitigate the effects of VR motion sickness.

Here's how the system - also known as Copernic360 - works.

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VR motion sickness solution

The Copernic360 system solves motion sickness by adding more motion. Sounds odd, right? Essentially, Copernic360 allows those using VR to walk around in real-life, and this will translate into movement within the VR experience.

In explaining the system, McEwan said: "Their vestibular system, which senses their physical motion, matches what is experienced by their visual system. By ensuring these two systems remain in harmony, and not in conflict, Copernic360 eliminates the visual-vestibular conflict of standard 360-degree VR experiences.”

Of course, this may require users to dedicate a significant amount of space to their VR gaming setup.

You can watch Kagenova's explanation of Copernic360 below:

Motion Sickness and Brain Waves

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The Kagenova team is not the only one working on motion sickness - or cybersickness - solutions.

A research team at the Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) has also published findings from its quantitative research on cyber motion sickness that measured brain waves.

The KRISS researchers found that those who experienced motion sickness had a larger range of brain wave changes. The team hopes this study will provide a more objective baseline for analysing VR motion sickness in the future.

READ MORE: Best VR headsets 2021: The top VR gaming systems to get you started