Futuristic Public Toilets accessible with QR codes will track your cleanliness

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The ever-continuing search for futurism continues to the public outhouse. New futuristic public toilets are not only denying access to those without smartphones, but also track how nasty your bathroom breaks are.

Futuristic public toilets in America

Via Futurism, new startup Throne Labs is attempting to spruce up the roadman’s crapper. Using modern technology, the startup aims to make a new bathroom experience for those on the go.

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Throne Labs’ futuristic public toilets will only be accessible with a phone application. Using the app, you’ll be able to scan a QR code on the side of the public toilet and get to your business.

Furthermore, the computerised toilet systems will track how people do their thing. While the nature of tracking was not revealed, the toilets can allegedly track just how much mess you make in the bathroom.

Every user will be able to rate the toilet’s condition when they enter. Those that ruined the toilet prior will not be able to use any Throne Labs establishments again.

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Do we need to add tech to the crapper?

Throne Labs claims that the futuristic public toilets are adding a service to society. The company claims that it’s public bathrooms will help those who are disabled and those without homes. However, the latter might not be true.

As Throne Labs toilets are only accessible via an app and active internet connection, a large number of homeless people will be locked out. Granted, some homeless people do have phones, but a large percentage do not.

This means that one of the public toilet’s main demographics will be unable to use the toilets at all. With public toilets being one of the only places accessible for the homeless, Throne Labs is creating public services that can’t be used by its main demographic.

In the future, there may be other ways of accessing these toilets. For example, a login screen outside the bathroom instead of just a QR code. For now, though, the services offer needless restrictions for the sake of nothing.