Fired Oculus VR founder raises $450 million to turn soldiers into “invincible technomancers"

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The original founder of Oculus VR, Palmer Luckey has found a new gig. After being fired from the virtual reality company back in 2017 for supporting far-right groups, Luckey has moved to something far different.

In the years since, Luckey has gone on to co-found the startup defense company: Anduril Industries. The company is most known for border control technologies that utilise tracking and AI. However, the startup's latest project is a hair sketcher than that.

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Oculus founder wants “invincible technomancers"

In a post on Luckey's Twitter account, the fired Oculus founder revealed that he's working on technology for the military. After a round of funding, Luckey's startup has managed to raise a massive $450 million for their in-development tech.

The proposed technology aims to convert American and allied Warfighters into “invincible technomancers". Luckey wrote:

“We just raised $450M in Series D funding for Anduril.  It will be used to turn American and allied warfighters into invincible technomancers who wield the power of autonomous systems to safely accomplish their mission.  Our future roadmap is going to blow you away, stay tuned!”

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What does this mean?

Luckey's post is remarkably vague. However, it does suggest that his startup is looking to further enhance U.S. soldiers through the use of technology. In recent years, research into cybernetic exosuits has proven to be more successful.

Furthermore, Anduril's background in artificial intelligence suggests that AI could play a key role in this mystery tech. With projects like Neuralink looking to integrate human and AIs through brain implants, that could become a possibility. Even if it is incredibly terrifying.

After closing the deal, Luckey revealed that the company is now worth $4.8 billion.

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