FCC Commissioner reveals he’s terrified of Robot Dogs: “I’ve seen Terminator”!

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We’ve seen robot dogs do little runs, backflips and carry massive auto-targeting rifles on their backs. Is now the time to be scared of the rapidly evolving technology? Well, FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr thinks so.

Why is FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr scared of robot dogs?

Last week, robotics company Boston Dynamics posted an update video for their robot dog, Spot. Much like other Boston Dynamics videos, the clip showed the robot dancing. In this instance, Spot was merely moving in rhythm.

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In response to the video, Carr expressed fear at the rapidly improving robotics. Based on the intelligence and manoeuvrability of the technology, it’s not unreasonable to be scared of what it can do. After all, if the tech wasn’t viably dangerous, militaries and law enforcement wouldn’t be using it.

Carry’s fear was displayed on Twitter with the commissioner saying:

“I’ve seen "Terminator,” I’ve seen “I, Robot.”  I know how this ends. That’s why I’m hereby proposing a new rule: If your robot dog is too large to kick over in case of an emergency, it’s banned.”

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Boston Dynamics retorts

Carr’s fears were quickly shut down by Vice President of Policy & Government Relations at Boston Dynamics, Brendan Schulman. As the FCC Commissioner expressed his unhappiness with the technology, Schulman attempted to wash those fears away.

He said:

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“Commissioner Carr, our robot’s top speed is 3.6 miles per hour (you can easily outwalk it), and the round red button on the back instantly disables its motors. I would welcome an informative discussion about any concerns.”

But does an off button on this tech stop it from being dangerous? Does a slow top speed stop robot dogs from being able to cause serious harm? Those are both questions for the future.

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