Beast Canyon Intel Nuc can fit a full Nvidia RTX 3080 in its tiny chassis

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The Intel Nuc line of PCs is designed to harness awesome performance in a miniscule frame. With their new Beast Canyon Nuc, Intel has gone one step further. For those who want to, the new tiny PC can fit a full-sized Nvidia RTX 3080 inside a very small box.

Beast Canyon Nuc is a beast

Starting at $999, the base version of the new Intel Nuc isn't really much to write home about. The NUC11BTMI7 is powered by an Intel Core i7-11700B CPU, 8GB of DDR4 memory and a 256GB NVMe M.2 SSD. It’s not much, but it's a decent work PC that takes up barely any space.

However, for those willing to splash out, Intel has created some beastly configurations for the Beast Canyon.  For starters, the NUC11BTMI9 model swaps out the i7 CPU for an i9-11900KB for an extra £150. But that's just the beginning.

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PSX Beast Canyon Intel Nuc
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Intel has configuration options with multiple storage drives and RAM options. One option crams 64GB of DDR4 memory into the 8-litre volume chassis. Furthermore, the website gives you the option of including desktop-class graphics cards. On the website users can select from a MINI GeForce RTX 3060 TI or an EVGA RTX 3070.

Of course, there's still more.

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Just stick a 3080 in there

While not an official configuration from Intel, the Beast Canyon Nuc does have enough space and power to support an RTX 3080. In an official statement to The Verge, Intel revealed that the new model deals “with performance levels up to NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080”. Unfortunately, for those that love to tempt fate, the little-PC-that-could doesn't support the 3090, but we can dream.

Turning the Beast Canyon into a 3080 gaming rig will likely drive up the system’s cost by a huge margin. Furthermore, just because you can stuff a 3080 in there doesn't mean you should.

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