NASA is sending human nudes into space to attract aliens 

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When we said we wanted to attract aliens to Earth, we didn’t mean for coitus. However, someone at NASA has decided to get a little bit saucy with our messages to the stars, including a little bit of nudity to sweeten the extraterrestrial deal. 

NASA sends the aliens some nudes 

As part of NASA’s Beacon in the Galaxy initiative, a new slew of messages to would-be aliens, an image of naked humans has been included. The message also includes a variety of other important 

The image — coded in binary — shows two naked humans standing side-by-side. Due to the small file size, it’s more of a crude drawing than an actual nude image. Nevertheless, NASA has allotted enough disk space to create some details. 

For example, the nude image — while crude — has enough details to show off the human form in all its glory. This means that human genitalia is all included; cobbler’s aws and all. 

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0 Scientists send nude pictures of humans to space in the hope of attracting aliens
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Another unrealistic body expectation for humans.

Alongside images of MS Paint pornography, other data is included. This includes the location to Earth, our understanding of the solar system, and an image of how gravity works. 

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Why is Beacon in the Galaxy coded in binary?

NASA has purposefully decided to create its new message to the stars in binary for multiple reasons. For one, it leads for incredibly small file sizes; secondly, it’s the simplest form of mathematics. 

“Though the concept of mathematics in human terms is potentially unrecognizable to extra-terrestrial intelligence, binary is likely universal across all intelligence,” NASA says. “Binary is the simplest form of mathematics as it involves only two opposing states: zero and one, yes or no, black or white, mass or empty space.”

Beacon in the Galaxy isn’t the first time the space administration has sent messages into space. For example, in 1972, Pioneer 10 sent plaques of human information into space. Afterwards, Pioneer 11 followed suit in 1973. These also included images of naked humans.