How many Teraflops does the Xbox Series S have? How much more powerful is the Xbox Series X?

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With the official Xbox Series S reveal finally behind us, we can start to dig into the nitty-gritty behind the console.

There is a lot of new information about this next-gen machine, and while all of it is interesting, not all of it is very straight-forwards.

That's why we've decided it's a good idea to try and help you understand it all a bit better.

So, here's everything you need to know about how many teraflops the Xbox Series S has.

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What is a teraflop?

Right, before we talk about how many teraflops the Xbox Series S has, how about we talk about what a teraflop actually is.

Well, in essence, a teraflop is a measurement of a computer's performance. The tera part basically means one million, and a FLOP is actually an acronym that stands for Floating-Point Operations per second.

That means that a single teraflop is the ability to compute one billion floating-point operations per second, which is a frankly absurd number that we're not really able to wrap our heads around fully as human beings.

Basically, more teraflops means more processing power, and that, in turn, means better performance in our games, more complicated games, and just a generally better experience.

READ MORE: How to build an Xbox Series X from PC components

How many teraflops does the Xbox Series S have?

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Right then, onto the specific numbers.

The Xbox Series S has four teraflops, which means it can compute four billion floating-point operations per second, and that is an awful lot.

Well, it sounds like a lot, but it's actually less than the Xbox One X, which has six teraflops.

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The Xbox Series X has twelve teraflops, which is three times more than the Series S. That doesn't necessarily equate to three times the power though, it's all about how all of these numbers are actually used, rather than just how it all looks on paper.

READ MORE: Xbox Series X controller design evolution