Xbox Series X pre-order guide: Amazon and Argos go live, along with the official Microsoft product page

Be one of the first to buy the Xbox Series X, now that pre-orders have begun!

by Jason Coles

Pre-orders have officially begun for the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S consoles. As Xbox fans across the world scramble to find a next-gen console to order, retailers quickly burned through their stock of Xbox consoles, mirroring the slightly chaotic PS5 pre-orders from the previous week.

While the PS5 may be well and truly sold out, there are a few Xbox consoles left in the wild, waiting to be snapped up by gamers excited by Microsoft’s acquisition of Bethesda.

If you’re looking for a next-gen Xbox console, we’ve got you covered below. But be warned – stock seems to be running out fast, wherever you look!

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Where to pre-order the Xbox Series X

Right now, we are seeing live product pages on Argos for the Xbox Series S and Xbox Series X consoles – you can click either of those links to see them!

From a broad point of view, Microsoft has disclosed the full list of participating retailers selling Xbox Series X’s across the world. Here’s the breakdown:

  • United States: Microsoft Store, Amazon, Best Buy, GameStop, Walmart, Target, Sam’s Club, Newegg, and other participating retailers
  • Canada: Microsoft Store, Amazon, Walmart, Best Buy, EB Games, The Source, and other participating retailers
  • United Kingdom: Microsoft Store, GAME, Amazon, Dixons, Currys PC World, Argos, John Lewis, Smyths Toys, VERY, AO, Tesco, Simply Game, Shopto and other participating retailers
  • Australia: Microsoft Store, JB Hifi, EB Games, Telstra, Harvey Norman, and other participating retailers
  • New Zealand: Microsoft Store, JB HiFi, EB Games, Spark, and other participating retailers
  • Europe, the Middle East, and Africa: Microsoft Store, Amazon, MediaMarkt, GameStop, FNAC, Elkjøp/Elgiganten and other participating retailers

Right now, we know that Argos has sold out of its Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S stock, but if you click on either of those two links, you can register to be notified by Argos about stock availability!

There is also a live product page for the Xbox Series X on Amazon – you can click here to check it out. And there’s an Amazon page for the Xbox Series S here. However, at the time of writing, both these two products are “Currently Unavailable” and are likely sold out while Amazon attempts to restock.

The pre-order listing on the official Microsoft Store for the Xbox Series X, which you can view in the US here, or here if you’re in the UK, is also now out of stock.

However, the Xbox Series S is still available on the Microsoft Store! You can pre-order the budget console from this link in the UK, or from here in the US, although stock might not last long!

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When did Xbox Series X pre-orders begin?

The Series X and Series S became available to pre-order from September 22, 2020, just under two months before the console launches.

Pre-orders opened 11 AM ET/8 AM PT in the US and Canada, and 8 AM BST in the UK.

Pre-orders opened in Australia and New Zealand at 8 AM AEST and 8 AM NZST, respectively. For the rest of the world, pre-orders opened at 9 AM CEST.

Pre-order Xbox Series X via Xbox All Access

If you’re unwilling splash out $499.99/£449.99 for the Xbox Series X at launch, Microsoft will also allow you to pay a monthly fee, starting at £28.99/mo. for the Series X in the UK, and $34.99/mo. in the US.

Pre-orders for Xbox All Access also opened on September 22 at the time as the normal Xbox Series X pre-orders. The service is available from the following retailers:

  • United States: Best Buy, GameStop, Microsoft Store, and Walmart
  • Australia: Telstra
  • New Zealand: Spark
  • UK: GAME and Smyths Toys
  • Denmark: Elgiganten
  • Finland: Gigantti
  • Norway: Elkjøp
  • Sweden: Elgiganten

The service will also be available in Canada, France, Poland and South Korea ahead of the Xbox Series X’s launch, but orders did not open on September 22.

READ MORE: Everything you need to know about Microsoft’s Xbox All Access scheme

Jason Coles