Self-driving Tesla confusedly crashes into $3.5 million private jet

share to other networks share to twitter share to facebook

It’s not unfair to say that Tesla's full self-driving AI is far from perfect. The self-driving Tesla software has consistently shown major issues such as being confused by the moon or swerving into oncoming traffic.

However, as new features roll out for the automated automotive software, new issues keep popping up, often without fixing old ones. For example, the service's new Smart Summon feature is causing more crashes than expected.

Self-driving Tesla crashes into expensive jet

Advertisement

Tesla’s Smart Summon feature is a system designed to bring a user’s car to them from the driveway or out of tight parking situations. However, over the past few weeks, amidst over 550,000 uses, there have been numerous issues with the technology.

Via Electrek, one high-profile issue with Smart Summon saw a self-driving Tesla crash into a $3.5 million private jet. Shared on Reddit, a automated Tesla made contact with the multi-million vehicle, pushing it out of the way.

At an event for your plane manufacturer, a Tesla Model Y is called towards the vehicle. However, the self-driving Tesla doesn't stop; instead of stopping before making contact with the jet, it slams into the body, pushing it.

Read More: Elon Musk wants to use Tesla Bot to make catgirl sexbots

Who is at fault?

Tesla’s self-summon feature is only supposed to work while the user is holding down a button on the Tesla phone app. As soon as the user removes their finger, the vehicle is supposed to stop moving. Additionally, the vehicle is supposed to avoid obstacles, hence the “Smart” part of Smart Summon.

It is concerning that the Model Y did not stop before making contact with the plane for two reasons. For starters, this could mean that the Tesla continued driving after the user stopped holding the button. (After all, who wouldn't notice a jet being hit by a car.) Furthermore, it shows that Tesla’s object detection is still extremely rough.

Much like every Tesla error video, it shows that self-driving Tesla software has a long way to go. While technically in beta, Tesla’s worrisome software is still in the hands of regular people, and consistent issues keep occurring.